Apple

Redefining Accessible Software

Redefining Accessible Software

On MacStories.net, tech writer Steven Aquino presents an interesting analysis on the impact of Apple technology on the lives of people with disabilities. “I have disabilities myself, so I'm part of the group who uses assistive technology to access their Apple devices,” says Mr. Aquino on his personal blog.   

Apple Proposes a New Line of Accessibility Emoji

Apple Proposes a New Line of Accessibility Emoji

It’s time for “greater representation for diversity within the emoji universe,” says Apple. The tech giant recently proposed a new line of emoji to the Unicode Consortium. Unicode is one of the computing industry’s standards for the consistent encoding, representation, and handling of text. Working with organizations like American Council of the Blind, the Cerebral Palsy Foundation and the National Association of the Deaf, Apple proposed a total of 13 new emoji, for a total of 45 when including variants for gender and skin tone. 

Accessibility as a Core Value

Accessibility as a Core Value

Apple CEO Tim Cook says accessibility is a human right, and everyone should have equal opportunity and access.  That’s why he invited three YouTubers to the Apple campus recently to discuss Apple’s role on the subject in honour of Global Accessibility Awareness Day. The young filmmakers each have their own accessibility issue.

Apple Videos Showcasing Accessible Tech Changing Lives

Apple Videos Showcasing Accessible Tech Changing Lives

Apple recently released a series of seven videos highlighting the tech company’s focus on accessible technology and emphasizes the importance of accessibility tech, design and features stories. Three of these individual stories are featured in an article written for Mashable.com by Katie Dupere.

How Apple and Facebook bring tech accessibility to the masses

How Apple and Facebook bring tech accessibility to the masses

According to CNET, a world leader in tech product reviews, news, forums and videos, two billion photos are uploaded onto Facebook every day. It’s a very visual tool, but not so useful for users who are blind or visually impaired. That was the case up until May 2016 when Facebook engineer, Matt King, designed a tool which generates a colourful list-like description of every photo using object recognition.