inclusion

Parks for Inclusion

Parks for Inclusion

Everyone deserves a park, says America’s National Recreational Parks Association (NRPA). The NRPA is dedicated to ensuring that all people have access to the benefits of local parks and recreation. To achieve this, NRPA has made a formal commitment to the Partnership for Inclusive Health’s Commit to Inclusion initiative. They’re calling the three-year pledge “Parks for Inclusion.”

Considering a Diversity or Inclusion Campaign?

Considering a Diversity or Inclusion Campaign?

Understanding of the benefits of diversity and inclusion is taking hold across Canadian industry. Steve Steck is Vice President of Business Development & Brand Strategy at Public Inc. Public Inc is a Toronto-based social impact marketing agency and consultancy. Mr. Steck has these words of advice for organizations who want to improve their levels of diversity and inclusion. The article appeared on Charity Village.

Getting Diversity and Inclusion Right

Getting Diversity and Inclusion Right

In an op-ed piece in the Ottawa Business Journal, the CEO of Klipfolio says he believes in diversity and inclusion, but that so many companies struggle, because it’s hard. Allan Willie is candid in this honest op-ed, about how diversity and inclusion are a goal at Klipfolio, but the definition of “diversity” changes all the time, and it’s hard to know when they’ve got it right.

Accessibility with Imagination

Accessibility with Imagination

We can fly through space. We can walk on the moon. But we cannot make our world accessible? Delivered in sign language with a voice over, deaf communication specialist and disability activist Eva Westerhoff explains in this Tedx video using vivid language what it’s like to be left out.

The AccessNow App

The AccessNow App

Toronto masters student Maayan Ziv wonders every day of her life whether she’ll be able to get where she needs to go that day.  Just about everything is online, she explains in this video, but until now, accessibility was a roll of the dice. Getting ready to go out on a Friday night, the twenty-five year old says she could find out how much the beer was going to be that night, and the specials, the ratings and reviews, “but not whether a place is accessible.” Maayan uses a wheelchair due to muscular dystrophy. “I have to ask this every day.  This is a problem in my life. There are millions of people who can benefit,” she says.  “I have to do this.”