Design

What is Inclusive Design - and What it Isn’t

What is Inclusive Design - and What it Isn’t

On Mismatch, a digital magazine for designers, founder Kat Holmes calls inclusive design “a skill that is developed with practice, over time.” Holmes continues, “In my education as an engineer, designer, and citizen I never formally learned about inclusion or exclusion. Accessibility, sociology, and civil rights weren’t required curricula for learning how to build technology.” For designers, she writes, “three fears of inclusion will likely strike you at some point. If so, you’re not alone. But from each of them grows an insight into the nature of inclusion.”

Seven Ways to Introduce UDL into Your Classroom

Seven Ways to Introduce UDL into Your Classroom

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) emerged about ten years ago as a barrier-free approach to teaching and learning. Educators who have included it in their practice have shared that it has revolutionized their teaching practice. Here are some ways to introduce UDL into a classroom, from Text Help (www.texthelp.com).

The Difference Between Inclusive Design and Accessibility

The Difference Between Inclusive Design and Accessibility

In its magazine The New Standard, watch designer (and retailer) Eone gives an eloquent answer the question “What’s the Difference Between ‘Inclusive Design’ and ‘Accessibility’?” Although this is a marketing piece, the approach and tone conveyed are thoughtful and sincere.

Ten Reasons Why Inclusive Design is Good

Ten Reasons Why Inclusive Design is Good

“Good design is inclusive design. Design should always be judged by whether or not it achieves an inclusive environment. Design which does not do this is not good enough. Good design should reflect the diversity of people who use it and not impose barriers of any kind.” This article on Lumesse Learning.com (lumesselearning.com) explains the origins of good design, and the difference between accessibility and inclusive design.

All Design Should be Human-Centred

All Design Should be Human-Centred

“Part of our obligation as architects is to help drive social change,” says Toronto architect and accessibility champion Susan Ruptash. Her impassioned call for better design is detailed in this opinion piece in Canadian Architect magazine (http://www.canadianarchitect.com). Ms. Ruptash offers the following insight in her article.

Access for All Design Guidelines

Access for All Design Guidelines

As a member of the European Union, Malta’s National Commission for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities has created a comprehensive set of guidelines for designing public spaces. A set of “Access for All Design Guidelines” are a requirement for all EU member countries. This is a technical guide, primarily designed to be followed by architects and engineers, and would be useful to any organization considering a renovation.

What the Heck is Inclusive Design?

What the Heck is Inclusive Design?

In this article, the accessibility editor for Smashing Magazine  discusses inclusive web design. Heydon Pickering calls himself a front-end developer, user experience designer and accessibility engineer. Although his article is complex, his message is simple.  “Inclusive design means designing things for people who aren’t you.” Heydon Pickering’s Inclusive Design Tips:

Designing For Accessibility and Inclusion

Designing For Accessibility and Inclusion

To design for accessibility means to be inclusive to the needs of your users. This includes your target users, users outside of your target demographic, users with disabilities, and even users from different cultures and countries. Understanding those needs is the key to crafting better and more accessible experiences for them.

Housing: When Accessibility Becomes the Norm and not the Exception

Housing: When Accessibility Becomes the Norm and not the Exception

A Toronto builder has caught onto the idea of intentionally designing condos that are easily modified to accommodate people with disabilities. Most builders don't currently offer accessibility as a standard option, and adding such features or retrofitting an existing unit can run to thousands or tens of thousands of dollars.

Fashion Responding to Customers with Disabilities

Fashion Responding to Customers with Disabilities

Glamour, the American fashion magazine, recently published a first-person piece by a writer with on the topic of fashion for people with disabilities. Writer Keah Brown, who is a person who has cerebral palsy, says every day actions like buttoning pants is frustrating and time-consuming. Now, she says, people with disabilities are starting to ease onto the radar of a tiny slice of the fashion industry.

John’s Accessible Summer Adventures: Art Gallery of Ontario

John’s Accessible Summer Adventures: Art Gallery of Ontario

The Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) located in Toronto, Ontario is one of the favourite spots to visit by the Together We Rock! team.  The AGO is one of the largest art museums in North America with an estimated 95,000 works including the renowned collection by the Group of Seven.

Designing a Barrier Free Garden

Designing a Barrier Free Garden

Community gardens create opportunities for learning and community participation, and of course, the freshest possible food at harvest time. By going the extra steps to make a community barrier free, all people in your neighbourhood can have the experience of gardening.

How Inclusive Design Works for Everyone

How Inclusive Design Works for Everyone

 Inclusive Design is the design and composition of an environment or product so it can be accessed, understood and used to the greatest extent possible by all people regardless of their age, size, ability or disability.

Mapping Wheelchair Accessibility

Mapping Wheelchair Accessibility

Finding your way around your own city or even a new one has become a lot easier in the digital age. Apps like Google Maps means you can have a planet’s worth of road maps at your fingertips inside your smartphone.Now, Google is making its Maps feature even more useful for people who have mobility challenges, especially when it comes to public transit options. The digital giant is harnessing the help of 30 million Local Guides across the globe who will exchange their knowledge, tips and photos about neighbourhood establishments and transit facilities.

Brock University Advancing Accessibility

Brock University Advancing Accessibility

Brock University located in St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada took advantage of the recent summer break to improve accessibility by reconstructing walkways to make pedestrian routes barrier-free. The new sidewalks now have embedded textured plates which serve as an alert for people with visual impairments approaching a street crossing. This is one example of the many ways Canadian universities are creating more accessible campuses. B

Shoring Up Accessibility on Canada’s Beaches

Shoring Up Accessibility on Canada’s Beaches

One of the most popular summer pastimes in Canada is a trip to the beach, either by a lake or on the ocean. But for people with mobility issues, especially those who use wheelchairs, walkers or strollers, these sandy and often rocky areas can present themselves as an unappealing hazard, rather than an inviting place to saunter along the shore.

Universal Design Benefits Post-Secondary Education

Universal Design Benefits Post-Secondary Education

Universal Design Instruction (UDI) is a scientifically based concept that emphasizes inclusive practices to maximize student success, including those with ranges in ability, disability, age, learning style, language, race and ethnicity. For post-secondary institutions, this not only means ensuring campuses meet certain criteria in accessibility, but also rearranging classroom seating so clear sightlines are available to all students. Additionally, institutions should provide materials in electronic formats as well as captioning and transcribing for video presentations.

How to Prep for a Universally Designed Classroom

How to Prep for a Universally Designed Classroom

There has been much talk and articles written about Universal Design for Learning in recent years. But, how does a teacher actually prepare their physical classroom and their students for the experience? A fourth-grade teacher, Beth, logs her prepping process in a to-do list which can be used as a blueprint for anyone looking to implement the philosophy in their school.