We’re All Wonders

We’re All Wonders

by R. J. Palacio (2017).  (Ages 3-8)

We’re All Wonders is a picture book by author-illustrator R.J. Palacio aimed at younger readers to influence them to join the movement to CHOOSE KIND. Readers are introduced to Auggie Pullman, a boy with an extraordinary face, and his dog, Daisy. Palacio shows readers what it’s like to live in Auggie’s world when he feels like any other kid, but is not always seen that way.

“Don’t We Already Do Inclusion?”: 100 Ideas for Improving Inclusive Schools

“Don’t We Already Do Inclusion?”: 100 Ideas for Improving Inclusive Schools

by Paula Kluth (2013). Illustrations by Allison Fiutak

Paula Kluth is an author, consultant, advocate and independent scholar who promotes inclusive opportunities for all students in a school community. Her approach by upholding practices of differentiated instruction, multiple intelligences and assistive technology, promotes students to act as co-teachers.

Collaborative Teaming: Teachers’ Guides to Inclusive Practices (Third Edition)

Collaborative Teaming: Teachers’ Guides to Inclusive Practices (Third Edition)

by Margaret E. King-Sears, Rachel Janney and Martha E. Snell (2015)

Fostering and supporting an inclusive learning environment cannot be done adequately without collaborative teaming and staff knowing how to work together effectively to support students. This book is a must-read for today’s educators as it shares practical tips, tools, strategies and illustrations to help teachers gain the skills for effective collaboration.

The Pink Purse (2016)

The Pink Purse (2016)

by Julie Pehar    Illustrated by Veronika Milne

A pink purse is the inspiration for a children’s story about inclusion, diversity and equity. Author, Julie Pehar, has done an exquisite job at taking complex theories such as systemic racism and simplifying them for children to understand. Based on a true story, the book is told through the playful voice of The Pink Purse. The Pink Purse teaches Kallie important lessons about kindness, discrimination, love and how people are different from each other and that is okay.

The Educator’s Handbook for Inclusive School Practices

The Educator’s Handbook for Inclusive School Practices

by Julie Causton and Chelsea P. Tracy-Bronson (2015)

Inclusive schools allow all students the opportunity to work and learn together and from one another, but what does an inclusive school truly look like? In The Educator’s Handbook for Inclusive School Practices, the authors share information and practical strategies to help empower educators to create inclusive school environments.

The Principal’s Handbook for Leading Inclusive Schools

The Principal’s Handbook for Leading Inclusive Schools

by Julie Causton and George Theoharis (2014)

“It is the principal who will ultimately make or break a school’s ability to be inclusive and to transcend from the rhetoric of inclusion to the reality of embracing the full range of students with and without disabilities as members of the general education learning and social community” (Causton and Theoharis, p. 2).

Rethinking Disability in the Private Sector

Rethinking Disability in the Private Sector

Report from the Panel on Labour Market Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities (2013)

This report from the Panel on Labour Market Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities is the result of consultations with 200 employers on their experiences in recruiting and employing people with disabilities. It examines the advantages, as well as the struggles, that exist in doing so, and includes practical advice from actual employers who are working to change perceptions about individuals with disabilities in the workplace.

Don't Laugh at Me

Don't Laugh at Me

by Steve Seskin and Allen Shamblin (Ages 3-8)

Don’t Laugh at Me is a non-fiction children’s book written by Steve Seskin and Allen Shamblin that explores difficult topics like bullying and exclusion. This book is a great conversation starter and can be used to help build a lesson around important topics like fitting in, being different, and celebrating individuality. This book is appropriate for both elementary and secondary age students. The main focus of the story is how children feel when they are laughed at or excluded by their peers. 

Applying Universal Design to Emergency Evacuation

Applying Universal Design to Emergency Evacuation

by Lee Wilson, Sourceable.net (March 17, 2015)

One important principle within a social model of disability is that of universal design. Universal design is defined by the United Nations as the “design of products, environments, programs and services to be usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design.” Applying the principles of universal design to buildings during emergency situations is the challenge addressed in this article, authored by a disability access and egress consultant with experience in the property and construction industry.

A Corner of the Universe

A Corner of the Universe

by Ann M.  Martin (Ages 8-12)

This novel follows 12-year-old Hattie Owen, who spends her summers at her family’s boarding house. She does her chores, drinks lemonade on the porch and reads. However, everything changes the summer her Uncle Adam arrives after the special home where he has been living closes down. Adam is 21 years old and has an intellectual disability. Hattie finds Adam to be fun and interesting.

Create an Inclusive Workplace Toolkit

Create an Inclusive Workplace Toolkit

Step Up BC

Creating an inclusive environment is important in any workplace setting. StepUp BC, a non-profit organization in British Columbia, Canada, has developed this toolkit for inclusive workplaces that are specifically in the non-profit sector. An inclusive setting is one “where all differences brought to the workplace are recognized” and where collaboration is encouraged and where people feel valued for their contribution.

My Three Best Friends and Me, Zulay

My Three Best Friends and Me, Zulay

by Cari Best (Ages 4-8)

Zulay is a young girl with three best friends. The four girls have lots of fun together at school each day. As the story unfolds, it becomes apparent that Zulay is blind. This fact is never stated outright because this is not a story about her vision impairment: the story focuses on what Zulay is able to do, and the ways in which she is included in her class and school community.

Since We’re Friends

Since We’re Friends

by Celeste Shally 

This is a story about a young boy and his best friend Matt. Matt has autism, and sometimes he gets frustrated or struggles with following instructions, but his best friend is there to help him in difficult situations, offering friendship and understanding instead of showing fear and judgement. His best friend does not pity Matt, but treats him as he would treat anyone.