Zero

Zero

Zero is more than a great resource for educators to use as a counting book for young children; it is a brilliant story about self-worth and self-acceptance. Using math and colour concepts that are accessible to younger age groups, Otoshi tells the story of Zero, who struggles to find value in herself as she compares herself unfavourably to the other numbers.

Chrysanthemum

Chrysanthemum

by Kevin Henkes (2008) Ages 4 to 8

Written and illustrated by Kevin Henkes, Chrysanthemum is a heartwarming story about self-esteem and accepting who you are, regardless of others’ opinions. Chrysanthemum is a young mouse who loves her name — until she starts school, where some of her classmates tease her about it being too long and the fact that she was named after a flower. Her teacher Mrs. Twinkle reminds the students that we should not judge other people but, rather, should accept others and make them feel included.

Inclusion in Action: Practical Strategies to Modify Your Curriculum

Inclusion in Action: Practical Strategies to Modify Your Curriculum

Inclusion in Action: Practical Strategies to Modify Your Curriculum is a newly released book by Nicole Eredics from Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co. Nicole Eredics is a teacher, speaker, and consultant who is a recognized advocate for inclusive education. Nicole’s highly successful blog, The Inclusive Class, is a well-respected resource for educators dedicated to the full inclusion of students with disabilities in school communities.

George

George

by Alex Gino (2015) Grades 3 to 8


Author Alex Gino dedicates this book to his readers: “To you, for when you felt different.” It is a heartwarming story about what it’s like to struggle with a feeling of being outside the status quo and yet wanting to be true to oneself. The book will inspire young readers and open their eyes to understanding and promoting acceptance, while celebrating differences in others.

One

One

by Kathryn Otoshi (2008) Preschool to Grade 2

One presents an important anti-bullying message in a way that primary grade children will understand. Author-illustrator Kathryn Otoshi tells the story using the simple means of personification, while the students are learning about colours and numbers.

Noni Speaks Up

Noni Speaks Up

by Heather Hartt-Sussman (2016) Illustrated by Geneviève Côté (Ages 3 to 7)

This is the story of a little girl who tries to do the right thing. Noni notices her classmate Hector being bullied and excluded at school. While at times she is speechless, Noni feels the need to do something to help Hector feel included, and to let her classmates know that it’s not okay to judge others just because they are different.

We’re All Wonders

We’re All Wonders

by R. J. Palacio (2017).  (Ages 3-8)

We’re All Wonders is a picture book by author-illustrator R.J. Palacio aimed at younger readers to influence them to join the movement to CHOOSE KIND. Readers are introduced to Auggie Pullman, a boy with an extraordinary face, and his dog, Daisy. Palacio shows readers what it’s like to live in Auggie’s world when he feels like any other kid, but is not always seen that way.

“Don’t We Already Do Inclusion?”: 100 Ideas for Improving Inclusive Schools

“Don’t We Already Do Inclusion?”: 100 Ideas for Improving Inclusive Schools

by Paula Kluth (2013). Illustrations by Allison Fiutak

Paula Kluth is an author, consultant, advocate and independent scholar who promotes inclusive opportunities for all students in a school community. Her approach by upholding practices of differentiated instruction, multiple intelligences and assistive technology, promotes students to act as co-teachers.

Collaborative Teaming: Teachers’ Guides to Inclusive Practices (Third Edition)

Collaborative Teaming: Teachers’ Guides to Inclusive Practices (Third Edition)

by Margaret E. King-Sears, Rachel Janney and Martha E. Snell (2015)

Fostering and supporting an inclusive learning environment cannot be done adequately without collaborative teaming and staff knowing how to work together effectively to support students. This book is a must-read for today’s educators as it shares practical tips, tools, strategies and illustrations to help teachers gain the skills for effective collaboration.

The Pink Purse (2016)

The Pink Purse (2016)

by Julie Pehar    Illustrated by Veronika Milne

A pink purse is the inspiration for a children’s story about inclusion, diversity and equity. Author, Julie Pehar, has done an exquisite job at taking complex theories such as systemic racism and simplifying them for children to understand. Based on a true story, the book is told through the playful voice of The Pink Purse. The Pink Purse teaches Kallie important lessons about kindness, discrimination, love and how people are different from each other and that is okay.

The Educator’s Handbook for Inclusive School Practices

The Educator’s Handbook for Inclusive School Practices

by Julie Causton and Chelsea P. Tracy-Bronson (2015)

Inclusive schools allow all students the opportunity to work and learn together and from one another, but what does an inclusive school truly look like? In The Educator’s Handbook for Inclusive School Practices, the authors share information and practical strategies to help empower educators to create inclusive school environments.

The Principal’s Handbook for Leading Inclusive Schools

The Principal’s Handbook for Leading Inclusive Schools

by Julie Causton and George Theoharis (2014)

“It is the principal who will ultimately make or break a school’s ability to be inclusive and to transcend from the rhetoric of inclusion to the reality of embracing the full range of students with and without disabilities as members of the general education learning and social community” (Causton and Theoharis, p. 2).

Rethinking Disability in the Private Sector

Rethinking Disability in the Private Sector

Report from the Panel on Labour Market Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities (2013)

This report from the Panel on Labour Market Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities is the result of consultations with 200 employers on their experiences in recruiting and employing people with disabilities. It examines the advantages, as well as the struggles, that exist in doing so, and includes practical advice from actual employers who are working to change perceptions about individuals with disabilities in the workplace.

Don't Laugh at Me

Don't Laugh at Me

by Steve Seskin and Allen Shamblin (Ages 3-8)

Don’t Laugh at Me is a non-fiction children’s book written by Steve Seskin and Allen Shamblin that explores difficult topics like bullying and exclusion. This book is a great conversation starter and can be used to help build a lesson around important topics like fitting in, being different, and celebrating individuality. This book is appropriate for both elementary and secondary age students. The main focus of the story is how children feel when they are laughed at or excluded by their peers. 

Applying Universal Design to Emergency Evacuation

Applying Universal Design to Emergency Evacuation

by Lee Wilson, Sourceable.net (March 17, 2015)

One important principle within a social model of disability is that of universal design. Universal design is defined by the United Nations as the “design of products, environments, programs and services to be usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design.” Applying the principles of universal design to buildings during emergency situations is the challenge addressed in this article, authored by a disability access and egress consultant with experience in the property and construction industry.

A Corner of the Universe

A Corner of the Universe

by Ann M.  Martin (Ages 8-12)

This novel follows 12-year-old Hattie Owen, who spends her summers at her family’s boarding house. She does her chores, drinks lemonade on the porch and reads. However, everything changes the summer her Uncle Adam arrives after the special home where he has been living closes down. Adam is 21 years old and has an intellectual disability. Hattie finds Adam to be fun and interesting.